DEVLOG 8 | 101

 

 

We hate tutorials. I cannot recall a time when I truly enjoyed playing a tutorial section in any game, an opinion shared by the whole team. They are boring, condescending and, at worst, they break player immersion.

Yet, just like any completely random anonymous child is obliged to eat asparagus at dinnertime (hate asparagus more than tutorials), we were hard at work developing a tutorial for Iteration in the last couple weeks.

 
60421-1-1540.jpg
 

Why? Well, turns out asparagus, as objectively inferior to meat and gross tasting as it is, is actually some very healthy food!

Iteration is still a child, but it has traveled  places already. Be it internationally or nationally, academically or professionally, Iteration has been displayed and available to try at a many different venues. These events have been great for us, allowing for gathering great feedback from all kinds of users.

 
3.JPG
 

And yet, while never voiced, we knew that there was a big problem the moment we had our first tester: he wasn't familiar with VR, much less with the Oculus Touch we were testing with and, after a good six minutes of explaining and awkwardly guiding his fingers to each button on the controllers, we realized that a tutorial was required, for the sake of our own minds.

So we did it, emphasizing the use of actual real life videos, employing a logic of "learn by doing" and being careful to minimize immersion breaking, we created a tutorial that we feel will be efficient while still keeping with the mysterious theme of Iteration.

 
 Real life video example.

Real life video example.

 

Hopefully this will lessen the load of showcasing the game, allowing us to get even better feedback from here onwards, and focusing on perfecting the actual meaty (hmmm... yummy) sections of gameplay.

See you in the next log!

 
Iteration VR